Week Five

This week has been really productive on the work front. On Wednesday we celebrated UN Cloth day, you would have seen the photos I uploaded last week. It was a very successful launch and presented a great opportunity to meet staff from the other UN agencies. On Thursday whilst entering some market price data into the VAM system, I was approached by a staff member from another unit, and was asked to collect the GPS coordinates of our farmer organisation warehouses the next day. That was all the information he gave me, along with a couple of printed surveys. I later found out (when I had a million questions to ask regarding the trip) that he had gone on leave for an entire week. Awesome! No one to assist me, ahhhhh. I was freaking out as this was my first time in the field, I was unfamiliar with the 10 different communities I was to visit and I hadn’t used a GPS in years. This was definitely way more than I had bargained for. Anyway, Friday morning came ( I was sleep deprived as I had spent most part of the night before refreshing my memory on how to use a GPS and also on how to download the collected data upon return) and the driver was waiting for me at 8am. We set off and our first stop was to collect the extension agent, he knew where the different communities we were to visit were located and he was also to act as my translator. My task was to take the coordinates of the 10 famer organisation warehouses throughout Northern Ghana. I was back in the office by 5pm. It was a huge day and we didn’t even manage to fill out all the surveys and collect all the relevant coordinates. In true Ghana style a lot of the participants didn’t turn up as was previously agreed, so I spent Monday morning following up on the missing information. Today has been exceptionally busy at work too, hence why I am only posting this blog now. There has been a lot of number crunching so far, this scares me as the last time I did statistics was 3 years ago now. The role is a lot more technical than I envisaged. I am up for the challenge though.

One of the leaders of the farmers organisation was stationed at a primary school. While approaching the school, all the children (they were on their lunch break) were frantically waving at the car. When the car stopped and I tried to get out, I was bombarded by hundreds of children screaming siliminga (white person) hello. I thought this hilarious, as did the driver and extension agent, so we took a photo.

One of the leaders of the farmers organisation was stationed at a primary school. While approaching the school, all the children (they were on their lunch break) were frantically waving at the car. When the car stopped and I tried to get out, I was bombarded by hundreds of children screaming siliminga (white person) hello. I thought this hilarious, as did the driver and extension agent, so we took a photo.

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As mentioned previously, my French housemate, Agnes is to move to Mali. Saturday was her last day in Tamale, so on Friday we went to the infamous Mikes Pub and Restaurant for dinner and drinks. Saturday morning consisted on the usual grocery shopping trip and I spent Saturday afternoon hanging out with Dun (my American housemate). Saturday evening was the event we had been talking about since arriving in Tamale and meeting the Dutchies. Lotte, Peter, Gerhard, Kim and Niekes housewarming party. It turned out to be really fun, there was delicious food, good music and a great turn out. I spent Sunday at home recovering from the night before; all these late nights seem to be taking their toll on me… old age J

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